Category Archives: Campaigns

Public seminar at UK parliament

Public Seminar at UK Parliament on Sharia Law, Legal Pluralism and Access to Justice

Sharia Law, Legal Pluralism and Access to Justice is hosted by IKWRO and several organisations and activists to debate and express concerns about the increasing state recognition and promotion of religious-based arbitration and mediation forums, such as ‘Sharia courts’ in the UK. These councils operate as parallel legal systems in which women are treated unfairly, including when seeking divorce or custody over children. The seminar will examine the range of injustices faced by women who engage with all forms of religious arbitration forums and sets out the reasons behind a growing campaign to end state legitimization of legal pluralism in the UK.

Religious arbitration and women’s rights

A meeting for BME women

In an Open Letter to Theresa May, an unprecedented number of BME women’s rights organisations and campaigners signed a letter warning against the rapid slide towards privatised justice and parallel legal systems in the UK.

Amina Al-Jeffery: An open letter to Boris Johnson

We the undersigned write further to our to demand in the strongest possible terms that the Foreign and Commonwealth Office brings every possible pressure to bear on the authorities in Saudi Arabia to ensure the safe return of Amina Al-Jeffery to the UK without delay.

On Wednesday 3 August 2016, Mr Justice Holman, Judge at the Family Division of the High Court, ordered that by Sunday 11 September 2016 Amina’s father permit and facilitate her return to England and Wales and pay the air fare. The deadline has passed and Amina and has not returned. Mr Al-Jeffery is therefore in breach of the court order.

Iranian & Kurdish Women’s Rights Organisation and filmmaker join forces to launch campaign in remembrance of Banaz Mahmod on 10th Anniversary of her murder

Banaz Mahmod

Ten years ago this week, Banaz Mahmod was brutally murdered and gang-raped by a team of men recruited and managed by her uncle. Banaz was a victim of the repressive codes of “honour” operating within the close-knit Kurdish communities. Forced into marriage at 17 years of age, then divorced after brutal domestic violence, Banaz fell in love with a man she chose, but this was considered to have brought ‘shame’ upon her family. After holding a family council meeting, the family decided that Banaz must die. Although Banaz sought help from the police several times, she never received the help she needed and was murdered, her body stuffed into a suitcase in London was driven to Birmingham and buried in a back garden.

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